1. (Source: doriswalter, via keyframedaily)

     
  2. todf:

    poster title: Supernatural Dream

    model: Azizi Johari

    (Source: spaceghostzombie)

     

  3. "

    For, I have seen the devil, by day and by night, and have seen him in you and in me: in the eyes of the cop and the sheriff and the deputy, the landlord, the housewife, the football player: in the eyes of some governors, presidents, wardens, in the eyes of some orphans, and in the eyes of my father, and in my mirror. It is that moment when no other human being is real for you, nor are you real for yourself. The devil has no need of any dogma—though he can use them all—nor does he need any historical justification, history being so largely his invention. He does not levitate beds, or fool around with little girls: we do.

    The mindless and hysterical banality of evil presented in The Exorcist is the most terrifying thing about the film. The Americans should certainly know more about evil than that; if they pretend otherwise, they are lying, and any black man, and not only blacks—many, many others, including white children— can call them on this lie, he who has been treated as the devil recognizes the devil when they meet.

    "
    — James Baldwin, The Devil Finds Work (via vinylisheavy)

    (via barryjenkins)

     
  4. (Source: audreyrouget, via cinefamily)

     
  5. keyframedaily:

    Silent Light (2007).

    Carlos Reygadas: ”What I’m interested in—not dogmatically, but on an emotional level—are those brief moments in which the truth is experienced. The truth is never absolute; it’s approached almost tangentially. Declaring a philosophical, religious, or social truth will turn it into dogma and therefore will prevent it from being experienced as real; it will always be normative. On the contrary, what feels real is poetic, ineffable, open-ended. Truth, by definition, is intangible.”

     
  6. (Source: todf)

     
  7. the-overlook-hotel:

    At the beginning of The Shining, when Jack calls Wendy to tell her he got the job as winter caretaker of the Overlook, she sits in front of a painting of a woman holding a dog. The painting is titled “Woman and Terrier” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

    Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is perhaps why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

    Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

    “I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

    Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen in the same Boulder apartment, and yet another can be seen at the Overlook, near the end of the film. A fourth hangs in Room 237.

     
  8. coeurelectrique:

    Days of Being Wild, Wong Kar-Wai, 1990.

    (Source: wilder-than, via lettertojane)

     
  9.  
  10. juliavickerman:

    This aired on ABC.

    (Source: twinpeakscaptioned, via robdelaney)

     
  11. the-overlook-hotel:

    Near the end of The Shining, as Wendy staggers around the hotel looking for Danny, she passes a painting of a cow reclining in a field, seemingly staring at the moon. The painting is titled “Moon and Cow” (1963) by Canadian artist Alex Colville.

    Colville’s paintings are often described as having a subtly unsettling quality, which is likely why Kubrick chose to feature them in The Shining.

    Colville died in 2013 at the age of 92. After his passing, his son, Graham, remarked:

    “I must say, I (felt) slight surprise when I saw Stanley Kubrick’s film The Shining and I suddenly realized my father’s paintings were in the background in numerous scenes. They were implanted in that film as almost subliminal messages.“

    Another of Colville’s paintings can be seen near the beginning of the film.

     
  12. geeksofdoom:

    Adam takes a look at ‘Creep.’ written, directed, and starring Patrick Bice, and co-starring Mark Duplass.

    SXSW 2014 Review: Creep

     
  13. Hallgrímur og Jeremy

    by Jeanette Bonds

     
     
  14. Jean-Luc Godard directing Brigitte Bardot for “Le Mépris”

    (Source: missbrigittebardot, via samsmyth)

     
  15. the-overlook-hotel:

    Twice in The Shining, Danny is seen watching watching cartoons on television: at the beginning of the movie during his first scene at the Denver, Colorado apartment, and then much later, while in a catatonic state following his assault in Room 237.

    The soundtrack Kubrick used was comprised of audio clips taken from the 1970’s theme song for The Road Runner Show, as well as a Warner Bros. cartoon called Stop! Look! and Hasten! The clips were rearranged to sit nicely against the dialogue, as well as offer ironic counterpoint — as in the melody that accompanies Wendy’s final line in the apartment scene: “Well, let’s just wait and see. We’re all gonna have a real good time…”